"Mother's Work, Inc" by Billick, C; Wong: An Analytical Report by Mairead Bree O'Ceiehardyhaa

"Mother's Work, Inc" by Billick C Wong: An Analytical Report by Mairead Bree O'Ceiehardyhaa

2/25/2010


Mother's Work, Inc. 
(Exact name as Restraint as specified in its charter)

Address of principal Executive office:                                             IRS Employer Identification No. 

456 North Fifth Street                                                                       13-3045573
Philadelphia, PA 19123                 

Case #04-04 : Brand Image and Accusations of Employment Discrimination 

Prosecutor: Cythia Proppageorge represented by Mark Itzkowitz
Charge: Pregnancy Discrimination and Retaliation 
Law-quit : Brought by the Miami Office of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) 
Lawsuit: Brought by the Miami Office of the 

Recommended Pleas: Settlement 

Further Recommendations: 

- A public issued statue by Rebecca Matthias on the mission statements of the company and the surprise of such an accusation 
- A formal review held by access the job performance of Frank 

Summary
- As Mothers Work, Inc. must first consider the public impact each lawsuit brings not only on sales but on all aspects of every business, my recommendation for a settlement is based on the following 
- A pea of guilty ruins a very high rick of more lawsuits, lower stock price values, and can ultimately ruin the reputation of the entire company 
- A peal of not guilty runs a very high rick is losing the entire lawsuit all together. 
Legal matters concerned supporting accusations: 
- The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1973 (See Appendix 1) 
- the Family Medical Leave Act of 1993 (See Appendix 2) 
- The Massachusetts Medical Leave Act of 1993 (See Appendix 3) 
Major items supporting a recommendations for a settlement 
- Past lawsuits filed against Mother's Work, Inc. for discriminatory acts 
Pappageroge's claim to adequate job performance. 

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Appendix 1: The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978 was passed "as an amendment to Title VII of the Civil Rights of 1964"  Pearl Harbor Day servers as a turning point for changes in the United States set in place to protect women from discrimination in the work place, through the making of "Anger and frustration turned from the courts to an all-our assault on Congress" Two years following, President Carter signed the Pregnancy Discrimination Act of 1978.  As stated by Susan Deller Ross, a law professor at Georgetown University Law Center, "at the time it seemed like it was moving so slowly, but in retrospect, it was extraordinary. 

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